Poem by David B. Gosselin


 

I Know Why the Red Rose Weeps

I know why the red rose weeps
Why she hides her tears in dew
As the summer breezes sweep
From those seas of peaceful blue,
And then like our dreams
She fades with the morning dew.

I know why the red rose weeps
Through the dreamy months of June
As the golden breezes sweep
Over the ocean rocks, hewn
By Neptune’s tide
As he guards each sailor’s tomb.

And I know why the red rose weeps
While birds sing their matin lay
And a gentle breeze sweeps
Our cares somewhere far away
To where the grasshoppers leap
And the happy children play.

I know why the red rose weeps
Through dreary September
As the cold wind keeps
Songs that are more sober
And sap slowly seeps
Into lonesome October.

And I know why the red rose weeps
Through those months of January
As the ice wind creeps
Through her sweet sanctuary
And the summer’s cradle
Becomes her cemetery.

For when the rose parts with its petals
And the fragrance of its dying breath
On fleeting breezes settles
Seeing her beauty bereft
While the air carries the ocean brine
Makes life all the more sweet with Death.

I know why the red rose weeps
When her buds have yet to see the day
When beauty still sleeps
Through flowery May
And the frost still keeps
Our dreams at bay.

For as when one can almost hear
The sun’s rays dancing
On the golden fields
And each frond spreading
As the wind softly passes
And the skylarks sing,

So I know why the red rose weeps
Why she hides her tears in dew
As the golden breezes sweep
From those seas of peaceful blue
And then like our dreams
She fades with the morning dew.

 

David Gosselin is a linguist and translator. “My passion has always been poetry, and that lead me to study new languages in order to access the greatest poetic traditions of other cultures. I learned Italian to hear Dante sing in his rightful voice, and have pursued Arabic for the same reason. I write based on what Edgar Allan Poe called the ‘poetic principle.’ That is the standard I aim for.”

Art can illuminate even the most elusive and difficult to comprehend ideas. Visual rules and tightly codified visual metaphors help scientists communicate complex ideas mostly amongst themselves, but they can also become barriers to new ideas and insights. Dr. Regina Valluzzi’s images are abstracted and diverged from the typical rules and symbols of scientific illustration and visualization; they provide an accessible window into the world of science for both scientists and non-scientists.

 
 

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